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Savannah Parks & Squares Rental Information

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If your heart is set on a wedding in one of Savannah's picturesque squares, you're in luck! Savannah's beautiful parks and 22 historic squares are available to be rented for private functions.

Savannah's 22 historic squares are picture perfect spots for a wedding ceremony or reception. Permits for a given space are granted by the city's Leisure Services department on a first-come, first-served basis, and applications must be received at least 20 days in advance of the event with activities outlined in detail, including expected attendance, staging, tent usage, entertainment, electricity needs and any other pertinent information. Applications for a special event permit also require an on-site meeting to review the event at least two week prior to the date of the event. Contact Leisure Services to apply for special event permits at 912.351.3837, or stop by their office at Daffin Park.

Only two events per day can be scheduled for a park or square, and all events will be scheduled on the hour. Event set up cannot begin before 7 a.m. and events in residential areas must end by 9 p.m.; break down and clean up must end by 11 p.m. All trash accumulated during events must be removed from the site by 9 a.m. on the day following the event. A maintenance deposit will also be required in order to obtain a permit in case of any damages to the event space or unusual clean up requirements for city employees. The deposit will be assessed depending on the number of people in attendance.

If alcohol is to be served at your wedding or reception, be sure to obtain an alcoholic beverage permit from the city's Revenue Department after you have obtained your special event permit. Also remember to consider additional permits for signs to be posted, sound systems or loudspeakers, electrical usage, restrooms or portable toilets, entertainers or performers, any street closures, or any vendors who will be in attendance at your gathering. There may also be additional deposits required for the use of tents or turf in the squares. 

For complete information on permitting, see the Leisure Services Department's full regulations, policies and schedule of fees here

How do you pick which square or park you want to get married in? Start here:

  • ​Calhoun Square: Abercorn Street between Taylor and Gordon Streets; established in 1851 and named for John C. Calhoun, Vice President of the United States under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson. This is the only square with all of its original buildings remaining. Event capacity is 250.

  • Chatham Square: Barnard Street between Taylor and Gordon Streets; established in 1847 and named for William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, an early supporter of the Georgia colony. Event capacity is 250.

  • Chippewa Square: Bull Street between Perry and Hull Streets; established in 1815 and named to commemorate the Battle of Chippewa in the War of 1812. In the center of this square is Savannah's statue of founder James Oglethorpe, facing south to guard the colony against the Spanish colony of Florida. This square was also the backdrop for the bus bench scenes in the 1994 film "Forrest Gump." Event capacity is 200.

  • Columbia Square: Habersham Street between York and State Streets; established in 1799 and named for "Columbia," the female personification of the United States. The fountain in the center of this square was originally made for Wormsloe Plantation, now a state historic site. Event capacity is 200.

  • Crawford Square: Houston Street between Hull and Perry Streets; established in 1841 and named for William Harrison Crawford, the American minister to France under Emperor Napoleon. Event capacity is 25.

  • Elbert Square: Montgomery Street between Hull and Perry Streets; established in 1801 and named for Revolutionary War hero and Georgia governor Samuel Elbert. This square has almost been completely lost to urban renewal. 

  • Ellis Square: Barnard Street between State and Congress Streets; one of the original four squares laid out in 1733 and named for Henry Ellis, Georgia's second colonial governor. This square was lost during the mid-20th century, but has been restored to a public space. 

  • Emmet Park: Bay Street between Lincoln and East Broad Streets; a green space along the Savannah River named for Irish poet Robert Emmet and featuring a memorial to Irish Savannahians. Event capacity is 800.

  • Forsyth Park: Bull Street between Gaston Street anf Park Avenue; a 30-acre park at the top of the Victorian District featuring Savannah's iconic Forsyth Park Fountain and several military monuments. Event capacity is unlimited.

  • Franklin Square: Montgomery Street between Bryan and Congress Streets; established in 1791 and named for American founding father Benjamin Franklin. The monument at the center of this square commemorates the contributions of Haitian soldiers to the 1779 Siege of Savannah. Event capacity is 250.

  • Greene Square: Houston Street between York and State Streets; established in 1799 and named for Revolutionary War hero General Nathaniel Greene who fought in the Siege of Savannah and was given Mulberry Grove Plantation after the conclusion of the War. Event capacity is 200.

  • Johnson Square: Bull Street between Bryan and Congress Streets; one of the original four squares laid out in 1733 and named for Robert Johnson, royal governor of South Carolina at the time Georgia was founded. unlimited.

  • Lafayette Square: Abercorn Street between Harris and Charlton Streets; established in 1873 and named for Revolutionary War hero the Marquis de Lafayette. Event capacity is 250.

  • Liberty Square: formerly on Montgomery Street between State and York Streets; laid out in 1799 and named in honor of the "liberty boys" who met at Tondee's Tavern to discuss a break from the tyrannical British government, this square has been lost to time. 

  • Madison Square: Bull Street between Harris and Charlton Streets; established in 1837 and named for the fourth president of the United States, James Madison. Event capacity is 250.

  • Monterey Square: Bull Street between Taylor and Gordon Streets; established in 1847 and named to commemorate the Mexican-American War's Battle of Monterey, in which the Savannah unit of the Irish Jasper Greens fought. Event capacity is 350.

  • Oglethorpe Square: Abercorn Street between State and York Streets; established in 1842. Event capacity is 250.

  • Orleans Square: Barnard Street between Hull and Perry Streets; established in 1815, this square was named in honor of the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. Event capacity is 250.

  • Pulaski Square: Barnard Street between Harris and Charlton Streets; established in 1837 and named for Count Casimir Pulaski, the highest ranking foreign officer to die in the American Revolution. Count Pulaski met his end at the Siege of Savannah and is memorialized with a bronze statue in Madison Square. Event capacity is 250.

  • Reynolds Square: Abercorn Street between Bryan and Congress Streets; one of the first four original squares to be laid out in 1733, and named for John Reynolds, first royal governor of Georgia. Event capacity is 250.

  • Telfair Square: Barnard Streets between State and York Streets; one of the four original squares to be laid out in 1733. Originally named St. James Square, it was renamed in 1883 for three-time governor Edward Telfair whose home is on the square and is now Telfair Academy. Event capacity is 400.

  • Troup Square: Habersham Street between Harris and Charlton Streets; established in 1851 and named for George Michael Troup, senator and Georgia governor. Event capacity is 150.

  • Warren Square: Habersham Street between Bryan and Congress Streets; established in 1791 and named for Revolutionary War general Joseph Warren who perished at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Event capacity is 200.

  • Washington Square: Houston Street between Bryan and Congress Streets; established in 1790, this square was named for general and president of the United States George Washington, who visited Savannah in 1791. Some of the oldest remaining homes in Savannah are on this square. Event capacity is 200.

  • Whitfield Square: Habersham Street between Taylor and Gordon Streets; established in 1851 and named for Reverend George Whitfield, founder of Bethesda Orphanage. Event capacity is 200.

  • Wright Square: Bull Street between State and York Streets; one of the original four squares laid out in 1733 and named for Sit James Wright, third and last royal governor of the Georgia colony. Event capacity is 200.

The hardest part is selecting which beautiful greenspace will set the scene for your big day! Check out our Instagram page for some inspirational images! And don't forget to download the Leisure Services Department's full document on policies, procedures and fees for park and square rental.

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